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November 28, 2010
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cablegate.wikileaks.org/

WikiLeaks has just recently begun releasing a mass amount of documents (250,000 or so) showing exactly what the US thinks of it's allies and it's enemies, secret orders to spy on friends and allies, and discussion among the embassies. It's all very revealing.

Here's a good article:
www.guardian.co.uk/world/2010/…

And another good article:
www.nytimes.com/2010/11/29/wor…

And one more:
www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-ca…

WikiLeaks has called this 'Cablegate', although I think this is far more devastating than Watergate was. I highly recommend that you at least read the articles above for a gist of what these documents contain.

More will be released constantly, and will continue to be released well into 2011.

From WikiLeaks:

"Wikileaks began on Sunday November 28th publishing 251,287 leaked United States embassy cables, the largest set of confidential documents ever to be released into the public domain. The documents will give people around the world an unprecedented insight into US Government foreign activities.

The cables, which date from 1966 up until the end of February this year, contain confidential communications between 274 embassies in countries throughout the world and the State Department in Washington DC. 15,652 of the cables are classified Secret.

The embassy cables will be released in stages over the next few months. The subject matter of these cables is of such importance, and the geographical spread so broad, that to do otherwise would not do this material justice.

The cables show the extent of US spying on its allies and the UN; turning a blind eye to corruption and human rights abuse in "client states"; backroom deals with supposedly neutral countries; lobbying for US corporations; and the measures US diplomats take to advance those who have access to them.

This document release reveals the contradictions between the US’s public persona and what it says behind closed doors – and shows that if citizens in a democracy want their governments to reflect their wishes, they should ask to see what’s going on behind the scenes.

Every American schoolchild is taught that George Washington – the country’s first President – could not tell a lie. If the administrations of his successors lived up to the same principle, today’s document flood would be a mere embarrassment. Instead, the US Government has been warning governments -- even the most corrupt -- around the world about the coming leaks and is bracing itself for the exposures.

The full set consists of 251,287 documents, comprising 261,276,536 words (seven times the size of "The Iraq War Logs", the world's previously largest classified information release).

The cables cover from 28th December 1966 to 28th February 2010 and originate from 274 embassies, consulates and diplomatic missions."

As of this posting, 220 out of 251,287 documents have been released, and they've been devastating.

Oh, and predictably as well, WikiLeaks was DDOS'd as soon as they released the files, but WikiLeaks gave the leaks to newspapers months ago, who released them on their own.
www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-ca…

WikiLeaks:
cablegate.wikileaks.org/index.…
Add a Comment:
 
:iconthe-necromancer:
The-Necromancer Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Yet another truly informative and courageous act by those not cowed into silence.
Reply
:iconkai17:
kai17 Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks man!
Reply
:icondarkenedearth:
DarkenedEarth Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010  Student Writer
Wow...the U.S. and South Korea are already looking forward to North Korea's collapse. Well, that' s predictable, because totalitarian dictatorships never last forever.

And it's not the best idea to put this stuff online. Just saying.
Reply
:iconmr-canada:
Mr-Canada Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010
Why so? The information is everywhere and uncontaminated. It's freely available and no one will be punished for reading and spreading news. And dA has no policy on treasonous information being shared.
Reply
:icondarkenedearth:
DarkenedEarth Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010  Student Writer
I'm talking about the U.S. govvies putting info on that "secret" system. Personally, I don't think it's that intelligent for governments to put this stuff on a system easily accessed by newbies to the government.

I really like the info, and I thank WikiLeaks for that. The U.S. should watch what they put on there next time.
Reply
:iconmr-canada:
Mr-Canada Featured By Owner Nov 29, 2010
Well in their defense, it was pretty secure. Just not secure enough, :P The internet itself was originally invented for the American military, so I'm not surprised they had a mass system...

It's hysterically funny how this internet system bit them in the ass.
Reply
:iconmr-canada:
Mr-Canada Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010
I'm actually quite pleased by this release too. I'm very firmly on the side of WikiLeaks.

It's brought far more truth than waiting 30 years for a 'Freedom of Information' would ever do!

WikiLeaks, the people's truth.
Reply
:iconmcoirad:
McOirad Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010
This was my favorite part:
"Mr. Saleh complains of smuggling from nearby Djibouti, but tells General Petraeus that his concerns are drugs and weapons, not whiskey, “provided it’s good whiskey.” "
Reply
:iconsolis-raige:
solis-raige Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010
The US is finally getting what it has coming to it. It's funny really. The US has already issued a formal apology to Britain, along with 3 other countries before the leak event went out.

It's like that awkward call you give someone that starts with the line "Hey remember when we got really drunk?".

In the words of one of America's biggest businesses,

I'm lovin it.
Reply
:icongodofwarlover:
godofwarlover Featured By Owner Nov 28, 2010
Bye Bye Wikileaks
Reply
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